Statements/Resolutions

Statement from Concerned Health Professionals of New York Regarding the Investigation on Air Pollution and Fracking by InsideClimate News/The Center for Public Integrity/The Weather Channel

Statements/Resolutions

In response to the release of the eight-month investigation ‘Fracking the Eagle Ford Shale’ by InsideClimate News, The Center for Public Integrity and The Weather Channel that found very dangerous air pollution and widespread health impacts, Concerned Health Professionals of New York released the following statement from Sandra Steingraber, PhD and Distinguished Scholar in Residence at Ithaca College, and Kathy Nolan, MD, MSL.

“The extensive investigation into air pollution from drilling and fracking operations in the Eagle Ford Shale of southern Texas has documented–in otherwise rural communities–alarming levels of highly toxic air pollutants.  These include benzene, a proven cause of leukemia, and poisonous hydrogen sulfide gas, which, at acute levels, can be lethal and, at chronic levels, is linked to both brain damage and risk of miscarriage in pregnant women.

“These results are consistent with existing and emerging research from Colorado, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania.  All together, these studies create a startling picture of the harms that fracking can bring to human communities.  As health professionals, we possess not only a duty to inquire but an obligation to take action to prevent further harm.”


Schuyler County Health Care Professionals call for Halt to Propane and Natural Gas Storage along Seneca Lake

Documentation, Statements/Resolutions

Statement by Concerned Health Professionals of New York in Response to a New Study on Hormone-disrupting Contaminants in Water Near Colorado Drilling Sites*

Statements/Resolutions

Of the 700-plus chemicals that can be used in drilling and fracking operations, more than 100 are known or suspected endocrine disruptors. Unique among toxic agents, endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interfere with hormonal signals, are biologically active at exceedingly low concentrations, and, when exposures occur in early life, can alter pathways of development.

In a two-part study published on December 16 in the journal Endocrinology, a team of researchers led by Susan Nagel at the University of Missouri reported a variety of potent endocrine-disrupting properties in twelve chemicals commonly used in drilling and fracking operations. The team also documented potent endocrine-disrupting activity in ground and surface water supplies collected from heavily drilled areas in Garfield County, Colorado where fracking chemicals are known to have spilled. The levels of chemicals in these samples were sufficient to interfere with the response of human cells to male sex hormones, as well as estrogen. Five samples taken from the Colorado River itself showed estrogenic activity. The catchment basin for this drilling-dense area, the Colorado provides water to 30 million people.

These results, which are based on validated cell cultures, demonstrate that public health concerns about fracking are well-founded and extend to our hormone systems. The stakes could not be higher. Exposure to EDCs has been variously linked to breast cancer, infertility, birth defects, and learning disabilities. Scientists have identified no safe threshold of exposure for EDCs, especially for pregnant women, infants, and children.

Contact: Sandra Steingraber, PhD
ssteingraber@ithaca.edu
607-351-0719


* C.D. Kassotis, D.E. Tillitt, J.W. Davis, A.M. Hormann, and S.C. Nagel, Estrogen and Androgen Receptor Activities of Hydraulic Fracturing Chemicals and Surface and Ground Water in a Drilling-Dense Region, Endocrinology en.2013-1697; doi:10.1210/en.2013-1697


Resolution 171 of the Medical Society of the State of New York

Statements/Resolutions

Tompkins County Board of Health Resolution Requesting an Extension of Time for Review of the Revised Regulations on HVHF

Documentation, Statements/Resolutions

Click here to read the report.


Statement in support of Concerned Health Professionals of New York

Statements/Resolutions

Philip Landrigan, MD, Chair of the Dept. of Preventive Medicine and Director, Children’s Environmental Health Center at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine

“By insisting on a comprehensive health impact assessment as a precondition for a decision to permit or prohibit hydraulic fracturing in our state, Concerned Health Professionals of New York is upholding the fundamental principles of preventive medicine. The unique vulnerability of children to chemical contaminants and air pollution – of the kind we know are associated with drilling and fracking operations – means that we must undertake the most thorough investigation and seek the input of many experts. This is no time for secrecy. Members of New York’s medical community must have access to the documents that are now under review by the team of outside reviewers. The public – who are being asked to assume risks of fracking – must likewise have input to the scientific process that is judging those risks.”


Resolution by the Medical Staff of the Bassett Healthcare Network Regarding Hydrofracking for Natural Gas

Statements/Resolutions

Statement from the Bassett Medical Center Board of Trustees

Statements/Resolutions

Physicians, Scientists, and Engineers for Healthy Energy: Public Health Considerations of the Draft Supplemental Generic Environmental Impact Statement

Statements/Resolutions

Click here to read the statement.


The Broome County and the Otsego County Medical Societies – Resolutions Regarding Gas Drilling and Hydrofracking

Statements/Resolutions

Tompkins County Medical Society – Statement on Gas Drilling and Hydrofracking

Statements/Resolutions

The Medical Society of the State of New York

Statements/Resolutions